Choose Something Like a Star

by Mormon Tabernacle Choir

Choose something like a star

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CD SKU 4920324

$2.99
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Reg. $16.98

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Product Description

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Squre present a loving tribute to the choral music of Randall Thompson. Included are the Frostiana song cycle; two Alleluia's; four excerpts from "The Peaceable Kingdom" and more!
  • The Last Words of David
  • The Road Not Taken (Frostian, I)
  • The Pasture (Frostian,II)
  • Come In (Frostiana, III)
  • The Telephone (Frostiana, IV)
  • A Girl's Garden (Frostiana, V)
  • Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening (Frostiana, VI)
  • Choose Something Like a Star (Frostiana, VII)
  • Say Ye to the Righteous (The Peaceable Kingdom, I)
  • The Paper Reeds by the Brooks (The Peaceable Kingdom, V)
  • Have Ye Not Known? (The Peaceable Kingdom, VIII)
  • Ye Shall Have a Song (The Peaceable Kingdom, VIII)
  • Alleluia, Amen
  • Allelulia
  • About the Author

    Mormon Tabernacle Choir

    The 360 members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir represent men and women from many different backgrounds and professions and range in age from 25 to 60. They reflect a medley of unique lives and experiences and are brought together by their love for singing and their faith. Their incomparable voices are the common chord that unites to form the choral group known all over the world as the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

    The Mormon Tabernacle Choir originated in the mid-19th century in Salt Lake City. As the Latter-day Saints moved west, Church President Brigham Young included musicians among members of the advance parties. Consequently, a small choir first sang for a conference of the Church in the Salt Lake Valley on August 22, 1847, just 29 days after the first group arrived. The origins of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir may be found in the desire and commitment of early converts to include appropriate music in both sacred and secular events.

    The Mormon Tabernacle Choir has appeared at 13 world's fairs and expositions, performed at the inaugurations of five U.S. presidents, and sung for numerous worldwide telecasts and special events. Five of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's recordings have achieved "gold record" and two have achieved "platinum record" status. The most popular was the Grammy-Award-winning 1959 release of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" with the Philadelphia Orchestra.

    For more information visit the Mormon Tabernacle Choir fan page on Facebook.

    View more products by Mormon Tabernacle Choir

    Reviews

    Average rating:

    (based upon 8 reviews)

    Great Christmas Gift for Friends, Neighbors, and Coworkers
    By , Submitted on 2017-01-16

    Because this work is based on the poetry of Robert Frost, this album, along with a volume of Robert Frost's poetry, made an excellent Christmas/Holiday gift for atheist, agnostic, and theist alike. Navigating the political quagmire at work can be challenging, but this album offers an excellent bridge for introducing the work of America's choir to those from a variety of backgrounds without the super strong Christian messages of some of their other works. That's not to say that the choir shouldn't produce Christian works--they absolutely should. However, my husband and I don't feel comfortable gifting the overtly Christian CDs to those who may be resistant, if not hostile to the overture.

    Different
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    As others have stated this cd isn't easy to get into. Of course anything by the choir is awesome. However,it isn't familiar and therefore takes a little time getting used to.

    soothing
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    When I first received/listened to this CD, I thought it was just OK. It took awhile to "grow on me". I recently listened to it again and found myself teary-eyed listening to the title song, and reading the words to the other songs and trying to understand their meaning, and I feel I've developed a new appreciation for this CD. It is beautiful.

    Great!
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    This CD is one that I don't listen to as often as the others, but the first song, last two, and several of the Robert Frost selections are brilliant. The CD is largely for those that appreciate Robert Frost... the feel is different than other of the choirs CD's...

    I haven't warmed to it, yet
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    The choir is great, as always, but I didn't get the familiar feeling as through the choir's other CD:s. If you are in for some easy listening and some "Spirit chills", get another CD.

    At last a recording of Frostiana
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    Another wonderful recording from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. 'Frostiana' is always a joy to hear and it's especially wonderful as done by the choir. 'The Last Words of David' is quite exciting with full orchestra. This recording is full of the great warmth of Robert Frost's poetry and Randall Thompson's music.

    The best of all Tabernacle Choir CDs
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    This CD is just awesome, I too listen to it in my car and it just takes me away to a special place of beauty. Robert Frost has always been one of my favorite poets and to hear his poetry put to music in such a special way, and sung by our Choir, just makes it that much more enjoyable...BJ Colbert

    The Choir's Best and Most Impressive
    By , Submitted on 2015-02-25

    Conductor Craig Jessop is one of the world's leading authorities on the music of Randall Thomson and has recorded much of this music before, when he was Director of the US Air Force Singing Sergeants. Having lived with these scores for many years, his interpretations are mature, well reasoned and undeniably effective. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Orchestra at Temple Square have hit their stride with this recording; each and every cut is absolute perfection. I love without exception all of the recordings which the choir has made under Dr. Jessop's direction but this CD represents an artistic pinnacle which exceeds by a margin their many wonderful recordings of hymns and other repertoire. This is the recording which should have won the Grammy last year--they was robbed!

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