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Hardcover SKU 5130341

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(based upon 2 reviews)

Over done
By , Submitted on 2016-07-04

I found this volume to be a restatement of LDS doctrine, along with something on how the doctrines were developed. It would be a very interesting book if it were not absolutely overflowing with unnecessary academic terms and big words, apparently just for the sake of big words. Givens must have been trying to impress his fellow scholars. It turns out to be dry as dust. I would love to see the book restated without attempting to impress me with the author's vocabulary. And yes I do understand all the words, but it is just a perfect example of an academic wrapped up in academe.

An Impressive Work on the Progression of Church Theology
By , Submitted on 2016-03-04

I have always loved the writing of the Givens, and this turned out to be no exception. I am a philosophy major at Utah State University (one of the only active, believing LDS students in that major there), and I had for quite a while been looking for a book that discussed a broad range of philosophical, metaphysical, theological and cosmological aspects present in church beliefs, and this one fit the bill beautifully. I will be using this book a lot in my major.

Givens focuses, as the cover states, on our conceptions of the cosmos, of the Godhead, and of the human race. Nearly every aspect of church history and doctrine is covered frankly, both the normal taught-every-sunday doctrines as well as more controversial ones. Parallels and contrasts in theology and christian thought are given in nearly every case, and it does a lot to legitimize Mormon beliefs in the "controversial" doctrines and policies from a theological standpoint. He does not shy away from pointing out possible mistakes and disagreements among the brethren that have happened over the years as well as their long-term implications, and this is the kind of frankness that is needed in discussion about church history and doctrine. It is books like these that debunk any stereotype of active and believing Mormons being "deluded" and "anti-intellectual" as the critics make us out to be. This book is another example of the ever increasing quantity, quality, and transparency of the scholarly work being done to expound on church rich doctrine and history.

I will say that while I found this book to be overall faith-promoting as well as educational, It delves pretty deeply into many philosophical concepts, and is clearly intended for an academic audience (lots of big, uncommon words). It would probably be over the head of anyone who doesn't have at least some knowledge of the basics of philosophy, theology, or church history.

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